Skip to main content

The 2010 Artemisia Collection

In my usual impulsive gardening  strategy, I amassed a veritable collection of artemisias last year (the English name is Wormwood, but let’s just forget that ugly old thing).  I am drawn to the silveriness of them, and decided to just stick a bunch in the ground and see which survived.

Here they all are, coming back again this year.

Top performer – BY FAR:  Artemisia “Silver Mound”:

artemisias 011

It’s already reached nearly the size it was at the end of the season last year.  I actually planted this rather late in the season, inspired by my mother-in-law in Calgary.  Apparently, it is vigorous, but not a thug.  It doesn’t seem to be growing anywhere else but in this neat, furry mound.

As opposed to its nearby neighbour… Artemisia “Silver King”:

artemisias 012

This seems to be spreading its wings nicely and popping up all over the place in the front bed.  Unfortunately, it isn’t really doing much ground-covering while it’s there.  I think I will only keep it if it does a decent job of covering the soil, because otherwise, that area will just look like a mess.  I’ll see how well it fills out during this season.

Then there is Artemisia “Silver Brocade” (accompanied by foundation-bed faux-stone froggie).  Half-forgot I planted this one, I suspect it’s the same species as the mysterious “Dusty Miller” my mother bought which just keeps on coming back.  In garden centres, Dusty Miller is usually the English name for Senecio cineraria, a frilly, thick-leaved silvery thing that is an annual here.  You buy it in flats, pop a thousand of them around your garden and throw them out in the fall.  The one in my mother’s garden which keeps coming back is most likely this Artemisia, which was a VERY late addition on sale last fall.  Doesn’t look like much, but there are a few plants and I really hope it fills in, too.  I think it would look very nice among the coleus.

artemisias 008

Finally, the one I thought would be my favourite, if only for the romantic-sounding name:  Artemisia “Powys Castle.”  Some people spell it Powis, but as far as I’m concerned, they’re just cowards, or Americans.  I was hoping it would take off there because it is a little more casual, or natural-looking, and less ball-like, than Silver Mound.

It has definitely spread, and there are lots and lots of tiny ones coming up, but they are just that:  tiny.  Here’s the biggest one, and you can see it is very much dwarfed by the irises behind it.  This one is smaller than the palm of my hand.

 artemisias 009 

Good thing our city councillor’s Free Compost Days are coming up.  Not that I know anymore whether it’s safe to use city compost.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

לימודי קודש/Limudei Kodesh Copywork & Activity Printables

Welcome to my Limudei Kodesh / Jewish Studies copywork and activity printables page.  As of June 2013, I am slowly but surely moving all my printables over to 4shared because Google Docs / Drive is just too flaky for me. What you’ll find here: Weekly Parsha Copywork More Parsha Activities More Chumash / Tanach Activities Yom Tov Copywork & Activities Tefillah Copywork Pirkei Avos / Pirkei Avot Jewish Preschool Resources Other printables! For General Studies printables and activities, including Hebrew-English science resources and more, click here . For Miscellaneous homeschool helps and printables, click here . If you use any of my worksheets, activities or printables, please leave a comment or email me at Jay3fer “at” gmail “dot” com, to link to your blog, to tell me what you’re doing with it, or just to say hi!  If you want to use them in a school, camp or co-op setting, please email me (remove the X’s) for rates. If you just want to say Thank You, here’s a

Hebrew/ עברית & English General Studies Printables

For Jewish Studies, including weekly parsha resources and copywork, click here . If you use any of my worksheets, activities or printables, please leave a comment or email me at Jay3fer “at” gmail “dot” com, to link to your blog, to tell me what you’re doing with it, or just to say hi!  If you want to use them in a school, camp or co-op setting, please email me (remove the X’s) for rates. If you enjoy these resources, please consider buying my weekly parsha book, The Family Torah :  the story of the Torah, written to be read aloud – or any of my other wonderful Jewish books for kids and families . English Worksheets & Printables: (For Hebrew, click here ) Science :  Plants, Animals, Human Body Math   Ambleside :  Composers, Artists History Geography Language & Literature     Science General Poems for Elemental Science .  Original Poems written by ME, because the ones that came with Elemental Science were so awful.  Three pages are included:  one page with two po

Are Jews an "underrepresented community" in children’s publishing?

I applied for a writing award yesterday. I'm not going to get it, but that's not what I wanted to share with you. Here's what I wanted to share. This box:   I stared at this box for a long, long time. And then I decided not to check it. Even though I believe people like me truly are underrepresented, we probably wouldn’t fit the definition in other people's minds. Why? Well, because we're European. Because we are white. Because as everybody knows, Jews control the media. (do we???) If anything, some people say, Jews are over -represented in publishing. And yet. Some definitions are careful not to include people like me. Like this random definition from the State of California which defines underrepresented for some very specific business purposes as: "an individual who self-identifies as Black, African American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Alaska Native, or who self-identi