Skip to main content

Speaking Geek: Pinning files to XP’s Start Menu

start menuYes, we “still” use XP.   Meaning, we tried Vista, it turned out to be less a software program and more criminally irresponsibility on the part of Microsoft, so now, after being told our original hard drive will never work with Vista again, we’re back to XP.

So I wanted our family phone list to stay “pinned” to the start menu, so I could get at it anytime I wanted.

It’s called shulppl.txt, (yes, it’s a text file – low-tech, but it works!) and it’s in a central spot on the hard drive, shared among everybody, but only parents (aka Admin users) have write access to change the file.

BTW, setting file privileges and permissions is WAY simpler and less buggy than Vista.  Every 10 minutes, Vista was denying me access to files I knew I had access to:  even my own files, on occasion.  At one point, I was the only administrator, and it still wouldn’t let me get at a lot of stuff without wasting an hour resetting inherited permissions. 

Or waiting for that awful Green Bar of Doom that fills up forever…

Anyhow.  I couldn’t figure it out and couldn’t figure it out.  So I turned to Google, and got the answer in just a few minutes.

Create a shortcut to the file somewhere - anywhere.  Drag the shortcut to the Start button.  Done.

The next time you open the Start Menu, you should see your file pinned right there at the top along with other must-have favourites.  (Snippy is my super-basic screen-capture all-in-one executable)

You can even, apparently, delete the shortcut once you’re through.

I’m mostly putting this up here so I can do it again if necessary.  But if it helps somebody else, so be it.  Apparently, people are hungry for technical information:  the most popular page on my blog is my “review” – slash – comparison of Windows Live Photo Gallery vs Picasa.

Pretty sad:  I pour my heart out on 745 pages (not counting this one!), and the one completely unrelated post is the most read, most helpful, most commented-upon and easiest to find with a Google search.

Maybe I’ll go back to being a tech writer if nobody wants my surreal ramblings about supper, philosophy, theology, the garden, my kids and, as Dennis Prager so often says about his show… everything in life.

Sulk.

Popular posts from this blog

לימודי קודש/Limudei Kodesh Copywork & Activity Printables

Welcome to my Limudei Kodesh / Jewish Studies copywork and activity printables page.  As of June 2013, I am slowly but surely moving all my printables over to 4shared because Google Docs / Drive is just too flaky for me. What you’ll find here: Weekly Parsha Copywork More Parsha Activities More Chumash / Tanach Activities Yom Tov Copywork & Activities Tefillah Copywork Pirkei Avos / Pirkei Avot Jewish Preschool Resources Other printables! For General Studies printables and activities, including Hebrew-English science resources and more, click here . For Miscellaneous homeschool helps and printables, click here . If you use any of my worksheets, activities or printables, please leave a comment or email me at Jay3fer “at” gmail “dot” com, to link to your blog, to tell me what you’re doing with it, or just to say hi!  If you want to use them in a school, camp or co-op setting, please email me (remove the X’s) for rates. If you just want to say Thank You, here’s a

Ancient Auction Secret: If Chinese auctions are racist, why do Jews love them so much?

Ah, Jews, Jews, Jews, Jews.  You sure do love your Chinese auctions, don’t you? It seems that even in an era of political correctness, within certain circles, this term just will not die . And frankly, I’m mortified. I’m not Chinese, but I have family who is Chinese.  Some are Korean, as well.  I guess this makes us more ethnically diverse than many Jews, but I suspect most Jewish families are moving in this direction.  Still.  Even if we don’t know a single Chinese person, we should still stop calling it that. First of all… is it actually racist to call it a Chinese auction? I figured I’d let Chinese people decide.  But when I turned to Google to find out how Chinese people feel about Chinese auctions, what I found was mostly… nothing.  Silence.  I did find some debate (presumably among non-Chinese people) over whether it was too far in the direction of political correctness to refer to these as a “silent auction” or (as in some parts of the States) a “tricky tray.”  (Ok

Hebrew/ עברית & English General Studies Printables

For Jewish Studies, including weekly parsha resources and copywork, click here . If you use any of my worksheets, activities or printables, please leave a comment or email me at Jay3fer “at” gmail “dot” com, to link to your blog, to tell me what you’re doing with it, or just to say hi!  If you want to use them in a school, camp or co-op setting, please email me (remove the X’s) for rates. If you enjoy these resources, please consider buying my weekly parsha book, The Family Torah :  the story of the Torah, written to be read aloud – or any of my other wonderful Jewish books for kids and families . English Worksheets & Printables: (For Hebrew, click here ) Science :  Plants, Animals, Human Body Math   Ambleside :  Composers, Artists History Geography Language & Literature     Science General Poems for Elemental Science .  Original Poems written by ME, because the ones that came with Elemental Science were so awful.  Three pages are included:  one page with two po